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High Sierra
ID:
1941
Comments:
Director: Raoul Walsh
Screenplay: John Huston, W.R. Burnett
Producer: Hal B. Wallis, Mark Hellinger
Cast: Ida Lupino, Humphrey Bogart, Alan Curtis, Arthur Kennedy, Joan Leslie
Genre: Classics

Running Time: 100
Aspect Ratio:  1.33:1 (NTSC )
Sound: Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono
Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
Features: Black and White
Studio:  Warner Home Video DVD Region:  1 NR
DVD Release:  Nov 2003 Discs:  1 (DVD) [$19.98]
Purchase: 
Reviews:  This 1941 melodrama is memorable for both its strong central performances and their intimations of how the previous decade's crime dramas would evolve into film noir--no accident, given the solid direction of veteran Raoul Walsh and the hand of screenwriter John Huston, who teamed with the author of its novelistic source, W.R. Burnett ("Little Caesar"). In the central character of Roy "Mad Dog" Earle, a fictional peer to John Dillinger, Humphrey Bogart finds a defining role that anticipates the underlying fatalism and moral ambiguity visible in the career-making roles soon to follow, including Sam Spade in Huston's directorial debut, "The Maltese Falcon".
Earle suggests a prescient variation on the enraged sociopaths that were fixtures of the gangster melodramas that shaped Bogart's early screen image. Pardoned from a long prison stretch, the weary robber is clearly more eager to savor his new freedom than immediately swing back into action. But his early release has been engineered by a mobster who wants Earle to pull off a high-stakes burglary, setting in motion a plot that is a prototype for doomed-heist capers--a small, yet potent subgenre that would later include Huston's "The Asphalt Jungle" and Stanley Kubrick's "The Killing".
What gives "High Sierra" its power, however, isn't the crime itself but Earle's collision with the younger, brasher confederates picked to help him, and the hard-edged but vulnerable taxi dancer they're competing for, played forcefully by Ida Lupino, who actually received top billing. Her attraction to the reluctant Earle is complicated by a convoluted subplot designed to showcase then starlet Joan Leslie, but the movie finally moves into its most gripping moments when the wounded Earle, pursued by police, flees ever higher toward the mountains. His final, suicidal showdown would become a cliché of sorts in lesser films, but here it provides a wrenching climax sealed by Lupino's vivid final scene. "--Sam Sutherland"


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